Be Prepared for Childhood Tooth Injuries

May 8, 2014 10:12 AM
PhillyDotComMay2014
 
AAPD President-Elect Dr. Ed Moody recently spoke with Anna Nguyen, Healthy Kids Blog Editor at Philly.com in regards to tooth injuries in children. 

According to the story:

Just as kids prep for their spring sports season, it’s good for parents to know what to do in case of dental-related accident. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recently released a guide that takes you through step-by-step on how to handle the most common childhood tooth injuries. It can be posted it in a convenient place for yourself and caregivers.

To tell us more about the guide, we asked Edward Moody, DDS, a pediatric dentist in Morristown, Tennessee and AAPD president-elect more about dental injuries caused by sports and activities and what to do in an emergency.

What mistakes do caregivers sometimes make when a child loses a baby tooth or a permanent tooth?

The moments just after a tooth injury can be traumatic for both parents and kids and knowing what to do ahead of time will alleviate some stress. Here are a couple of common mistakes to be aware of:

  • Spending time looking for a baby tooth. Instead, contact your pediatric dentist immediately. Remember, a baby tooth can’t be placed back in the mouth because it could damage permanent teeth.
  • Scrubbing a permanent tooth with water or soap. Scrubbing the tooth or cleaning it with soap and water can cause further damage. Instead, place it in a glass of milk and seek immediate care from your child's dentist.
  • Leaving the permanent tooth in a glass of water. Water can damage cells on the root of the tooth necessary for it to reattach. A clean container with cold milk is a much better option, or if milk is not available, place the tooth in a container with your child’s saliva.

Why is it important to contact your pediatric dentist after a child has a baby or permanent tooth knocked out?

Time is critical when trying to save a permanent tooth and reduce the need for extensive dental treatment. Contacting your pediatric dentist immediately is important as he can give you further guidance and advice to follow until you arrive at the office. Also, some dental injuries are not readily apparent, so whenever there is an accident involving dental or facial trauma, it's always best to have it evaluated. If your child does not already have a pediatric dentist, it’s a good time to schedule their first visit! The AAPD has a pediatric dentist finder so you can locate one nearby on mychildrensteeth.org.

To continue reading the article in its entirety, please go to: http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/healthy_kids/Common-Childhood-Tooth-Injuries--Be-Prepared.html

 

 


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